The Gift of Inertia

I have been thinking about this a lot lately.

Why is it that some of us are feeling more tired now that we have been ‘asked’ to stop in an attempt to control the spread of Coronavirus?

It’s certainly more than a physical response to the world and the ‘new normal’ around us – it is the symptoms we might display, but also in the words and phrases we use to describe how we are feeling.

Perhaps it is the notion that now we are not seeming to be overly governed by the ticking clock and pressures of deadlines…. the urgency to have things done…..

and it takes the focus of our collective consciousness elsewhere.

It brings to mind the sensation you may feel once you have stepped off a moving train once it pulls into the station.

When you are on the train you are reliant on the driver to get you from one destination to another in safety. You might take the time to read, talk, sleep, knit, do a crossword, catch up on emails or scroll through your social media accounts in comfort while the train glides along the tracks to the next station.

In that moment, when you are comfortable it may be an opportunity to relax and let your mind wander wherever it wants to go – as it lulls you to pause and breathe…

But when traveling in a train or any other vehicle, have you noticed how you continue to move forward when it stops, especially if it stops abruptly?

In my thinking about this I just kept getting a slow motion image of the carriage in front of the wheels momentarily until the adjustment is made..

(in the blink of an eye) to ‘correct’ the weight distribution once again.

Knowing that this is described as inertia I decided to investigate an actual definition of what IT IS with respect to the laws of physics.

Seeking a simplistic explanation, that appeals to all of my senses as a Preschool Teacher, I found this children’s website to help.

‘The phenomenon occurs because of Newton’s First Law of Motion: An object at rest (or motion ) will continue to be in the same state unless acted upon by an external force. Which means objects tend to “keep on doing what they’re doing,” unless disturbed.’

Leading back to my wonderings about time and the construct of time – especially as we are experiencing different levels of isolation and lockdown the world over – I have found myself processing this experience as an invitation to reflect, pause and establish the direction of my life.

A chance to really consider my personal values, goals and dreams for the future.

What a gift – to have more of what we feel that most of us feel we have had little to no control over in the recent past…time to read, talk, sleep, knit, do a crossword, catch up on emails or scroll through your social media accounts in comfort while the train glides along the tracks to the next station.

This is turn, gives us hope that we continue to value our time as we value ourselves…to discover what is most important and we will continue to pursue when the physical restrictions have lifted once again.

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